Tag Archives: Crate & Barrel

When we all become a market place, it is up to your supply chain network protect the brand

In a recent article, Crate & Barrel, announced that it would start selling other brands on their website. Click here for article. This is not a new concept. Companies such as Lord & Taylor, Saks, Macy’s, Walmart and JCrew are already selling other brands on their ecommerce platform. In the case of JCrew you can even purchase products such as New Balance sneakers in their brick and mortar stores as well. According to the WSJ article, there are more than 250 retailers already offering this functionality. This begs the question, are retailers and more specifically their eCommerce activities gravitating towards become more of a market place?crateandbarrelicon_400x400

Are we seeing another influence on retail from the likes of Amazon and Ebay, two online pioneers that made their businesses through offering their clients almost unlimited selection of products from a wide swath of brands. For the likes of Crate & Barrel it makes sense for their customers. For obvious reasons, they want customers who come to their web site to have access to the widest array of goods for the home. However, they cannot grow their inventory offered as fast as if they allow others to join their marketplace. Rather than spend time scouring for new products, niche vendors and the latest trend, Crate & Barrel can open up their platform and incentivize these brands to come to them. Makes sense, right? Yes, but there are some key issues these brands have to consider:

  • Transforming their eCommerce assets into a marketplace places greater pressure on the brand’s supply chain. The value that an Amazon offers when it allows vendors to sell their products via the marketplace is the massive supply chain and fulfillment engine that goes behind that front end web site. Retailers like Crate & Barrel and other traditional brick and mortar brands have struggled to seamlessly and easily bring eCommerce to their offerings. If they now take on a greater array of product through their site, product that falls outside their control, can their supply chains keep pace?
  • It’s the brand stupid. One appealing factor for brands to associate with the likes of Crate & Barrel is to ride on their brand presence and reach. For Crate & Barrel the positive is being able to offer their customers a deeper and wider product assortment. The risk for Crate & Barrel is that it is their brand that is on the mast head. What happens if one of the vendors they allow onto their online asset sells defective or subpar products? The real issue is that it is the brand, Crate & Barrel that will suffer.

So what does this mean? As more of these brands begin to explore the strategy of creating mini-marketplaces on their web site, they have the opportunity to expand their offerings to their customers (don’t forget as we have stated many times, the customer has now gained the power in the retail relationship) but they will have to rely upon their supply chain network at a more intimate level. These brands must be able to have absolute clarity with regards to which suppliers are being allowed onto the marketplace. There must be absolute understanding into the product offering, what happens post sale and how will disputes be handled by the entities involved. They must also have clarity as to the impact these relationships have on their financial supply chains. This requires a supply chain network that has a deep degree of insights and visibility, but also the capacity to have the flexibility to manage a marketplace that itself needs to be nimble enough in order to truly achieve the aspirations of the medium.

This is yet another example of the continuous evolution of retail. I wonder when I can start buying my groceries with that Basque Honey dining table on the Crate & Barrel site?

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Filed under Current Events, Retail, Supply Chain