Monthly Archives: November 2016

When we all become a market place, it is up to your supply chain network protect the brand

In a recent article, Crate & Barrel, announced that it would start selling other brands on their website. Click here for article. This is not a new concept. Companies such as Lord & Taylor, Saks, Macy’s, Walmart and JCrew are already selling other brands on their ecommerce platform. In the case of JCrew you can even purchase products such as New Balance sneakers in their brick and mortar stores as well. According to the WSJ article, there are more than 250 retailers already offering this functionality. This begs the question, are retailers and more specifically their eCommerce activities gravitating towards become more of a market place?crateandbarrelicon_400x400

Are we seeing another influence on retail from the likes of Amazon and Ebay, two online pioneers that made their businesses through offering their clients almost unlimited selection of products from a wide swath of brands. For the likes of Crate & Barrel it makes sense for their customers. For obvious reasons, they want customers who come to their web site to have access to the widest array of goods for the home. However, they cannot grow their inventory offered as fast as if they allow others to join their marketplace. Rather than spend time scouring for new products, niche vendors and the latest trend, Crate & Barrel can open up their platform and incentivize these brands to come to them. Makes sense, right? Yes, but there are some key issues these brands have to consider:

  • Transforming their eCommerce assets into a marketplace places greater pressure on the brand’s supply chain. The value that an Amazon offers when it allows vendors to sell their products via the marketplace is the massive supply chain and fulfillment engine that goes behind that front end web site. Retailers like Crate & Barrel and other traditional brick and mortar brands have struggled to seamlessly and easily bring eCommerce to their offerings. If they now take on a greater array of product through their site, product that falls outside their control, can their supply chains keep pace?
  • It’s the brand stupid. One appealing factor for brands to associate with the likes of Crate & Barrel is to ride on their brand presence and reach. For Crate & Barrel the positive is being able to offer their customers a deeper and wider product assortment. The risk for Crate & Barrel is that it is their brand that is on the mast head. What happens if one of the vendors they allow onto their online asset sells defective or subpar products? The real issue is that it is the brand, Crate & Barrel that will suffer.

So what does this mean? As more of these brands begin to explore the strategy of creating mini-marketplaces on their web site, they have the opportunity to expand their offerings to their customers (don’t forget as we have stated many times, the customer has now gained the power in the retail relationship) but they will have to rely upon their supply chain network at a more intimate level. These brands must be able to have absolute clarity with regards to which suppliers are being allowed onto the marketplace. There must be absolute understanding into the product offering, what happens post sale and how will disputes be handled by the entities involved. They must also have clarity as to the impact these relationships have on their financial supply chains. This requires a supply chain network that has a deep degree of insights and visibility, but also the capacity to have the flexibility to manage a marketplace that itself needs to be nimble enough in order to truly achieve the aspirations of the medium.

This is yet another example of the continuous evolution of retail. I wonder when I can start buying my groceries with that Basque Honey dining table on the Crate & Barrel site?

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Your supply chain – not simply about cost control

I recently attending the WWD CEO apparel summit in New York City. The event brought together a number of executives from the fashion world from the likes of Dior to Neiman Marcus, as well as fashion superstars such as Ralph Lauren, Vera 1477496755713Wang, Joseph Abboud and Diane von Furstenberg. Other than a fabulous two days at the Pierre Hotel, I took away some key themes to the event. The main talking points:

  • Supply chains are for more than simply cost control. Supply chains have long been seen as centers to control cost, but they are finally starting to be recognized as tools of differentiation, tools that need to be leveraged to gain opportunities within the space. The CEO from Neiman Marcus highlighted as his top initiative the supply chain. Without an efficient and robust supply chain, all the efforts Neiman Marcus are making to redefine their stores and customer interactions will fall short. The supply chains must be increasingly nimble to meet the shifts within the retail world. As we pass through the omni channel stage of retail and evolve to a state of constant retail, or ambient commerce, the supply chain has to be nimbler and more flexible.
  • Stores aren’t dead, just being redefined. As mentioned above, the store is not dead. Far from it. Brands such as Neiman Marcus recognize that the physical store remains an essential cog in the retail universe. However, it is undergoing a transformation and will continue to undergo changes. From bringing beauty salons, restaurants or coffee shops the real estate footprint for fashion and retail. The question for these brands is how do they better manage their ability to fulfill. As stores change dynamics, what are the repercussions of the overall network’s strategy? Brands and retailers must become even more sensitive to how they manage their inventory positioning and fulfillment as their distribution footprint constantly shifts. The retail footprint is evolving, the store is being redefined and driving the overall retail experience. As was often stated at the conference – retail and fashion cannot view physical stores as separate from web commerce, but both must go hand in hand. All one had to do was listen to Hudson Bay and why they acquired mobile eCommerce darling, Gilt. Truly creating a full retail footprint.
  • Consumers are the queens and kings of fashion and retail. The consumer runs the show, according to the numbers presented by MasterCard, close to 70% of the purchases are made by a female buyer. That buyer is also becoming increasingly driven by experiences and driving the relationship. Clearly the consumer continues to grow in strength. She expects to have unique products available, experiences but does not necessarily want everything immediately. Consumers want to have visibility into when they can expect product, but do not necessarily expect it always right now. Retailers and the brands need to keep this in mind, while they need to be sensitive to their consumers’ wants and desires, they must balance the importance between experience, available inventory and meeting consumer needs.

Hearing the presentations from main stage as well as the hallway conversation reinforce the notions that retail continues to evolve, and at an unprecedented pace. While these changes are happening at a breath taking pace, the fundamentals around inventory, supply chains and the consumer must be kept in focus.

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Filed under Current Events, eCommerce, Retail